Monday, May 31, 2010

more barry lopez and it could be a quilt

I am sitting on a storm pattern rug woven out of the mind of a Navajo woman, Ahinsaha, and traded to a man named Dobrey in Winslow, Arizona, for groceries in August 1934.
In the fall of l936 a Swedish farmer, Kester Vorland, his land gone out from under him in the Depression, leaves his wife and three children in the car and, picking his moment perfectly, steps back into the store to steal the rug while Dobrey is busy in the back with a broken saddle. He trades it the next day in Flagstaff for groceries and $25 cash and moves on to Needles. It is bought later by a young man named Diego Martin who takes it back to San Bernardino, California, with him. He boasts of it to his friends, a piece of shrewd buying. When he is married in 1941 he gives it to his wife and, one flat September night, they make love on it, leaving a small stain that the girl, Yonella, can easily point out but which Diego will not believe, even when she shows him. He believes it is a stain left by an insect; he forbids her to show the rug to anyone after this. He dies in a bar fight in Honolulu on April 16, 1943, a corporal in the Marines. Yonella sells everything. An old woman with red hair and liver spots on her throat pouch named Elizabeth Reiner buys the rug for $45 and takes it home with her to Santa Barbara. In 1951 her daughter comes to visit and her grandson John Charles who is ten begins to covet the rug; when the mother and daughter fall into an argument over something, the older woman angrily gives it to the boy (she snatches it down off the wall) as demonstration of her generosity. She later tells her daughter not to come back again and begins to miss the rug and feel foolish. The boy doesn't care. He vows he will always write her at Christmastime, even if his mother forbids it.
On the train from Los Angeles to Prairie du Chien the boy keeps himself wrapped in the rug like a turtle. He sits on the bed in his underwear with it over his shoulders and watches Nebraska. When he is sixteen John Charles falls in love with Dolores Patherway who is nineteen and a whore. One night she trades him twenty-five minutes for the blanket, but he does not see it this way; it is a gift, the best he can offer, a thing of power. That night she is able to sell it to a Great Lakes sailor for $60. She tells him it is genuine Sioux, there at the battle of the Little Big Horn, and will always bring a good price. The sailor's name is Benedict Langer, from a good Catholic family in Ramapo, New Jersey, and he has never had hard liquor or even VD but in three weeks in the service his father said would make a man of him he has lain in confusion with six different women who have told him he is terrific; he has sensed a pit opening. The day after
he buys it Benedict gives the blanket to a friend, Frank Winter, and goes to look for a priest in Green Bay, the football town. In March 1959 Frank mails it to his parents for an anniversary present (it has been in his footlocker for eighteen months and smells like mothballs, a condition he remedies by airing it at night from the signal deck of the U.S.S. Kissell). He includes with it a document he has had made up in the ship's print shop to the effect that it is an authentic Pawnee blanket, so his parents will be proud, can put it up on the wall of their retirement home in Boca Raton, Florida, next to the maracas from Guadalajara. They leave it in the box in the hall closet; they do not talk about it. Mr. Winter confides to his wife in the dark one night that he doesn't believe in the powers of medicine men.
On July 17, 1963 Frank Winter dies instantly when his foot hits a land mine in the Mekong Delta. His father waits a month before donating the blanket and the boy's other belongings to Catholic Charities. Father Peter Donnell, a local priest, a man of some sensitivity, lays the rug down on brown wall to wall carpeting in the foyer of the refectory of the Catholic Church in Boca Raton, arranging two chairs and a small table precisely on it (he likes especially the Ganado red color) before the Monsignor asks him to remove it. Father Donnell keeps the rug in his room, spread out flat under his mattress for a year. He takes it with him when he is transferred to Ames, Iowa, where it is finally bought in an Easter bazaar as Father Donnell endures a self-inflicted purging of personal possessions. It is bought by antique dealers, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Wishton Spanner of Jordan Valley, Oregon (as they sign the register). The following winter I buy it from Mrs. Spanner who tells me the rug has been woven by a Comanche who learned his craft from a Navajo, that she bought it on the reservation in Oklahoma. It is certified. I take the rug home and at dusk I undress and lie down under it so that it completely covers my body. I listen all night. I do not hear anything. But in this time I am able to sort out all the smells buried in the threads and the sounds still reverberating deep in the fibers. It is what i have been looking for.

It is this rug I have carefully spread out now, east and west over the dust. It is only from such a height above the floor of the desert that one is able to see clearly what is going on.
The moon has just risen; the sun has just gone down. There are only a few stars up and a breeze is blowing up from the south. It smells like wet cottonwood leaves.
This is the best time to see what is happening. Everyone who is passing through will be visible for a short time. already I have seen the priest with his Bible bound in wolves' fur and the blackbirds asleep in his hair.
I see the woman who smells like sagebrush and her three children with the large white eyes and tattered leggings. I see the boy who rolls in dust like a horse and the legionnaire with the alabaster skin polished smooth by the wind. I see the magnificent jethery loping across the desert like a greyhound with his arms full of oars, I watch cheetahs in silver chariots pulled by a span of white crows. I see the rainbow in arabesques of the wind.
The night gets deeper. I pull down to listen for Ahinsaha; she is crying in Arizona. This is what she is singing:
Go to the white rain
Ta ta ta ta
Go to the white rain
Ta ta ta ta
I see the horses
Ta ta ta ta
They are feeding above there.

There is no rain; there are no horses. Her music falls into pieces with her tears in the dust like lies. She smells like your face in wheat.
The moon is up higher, clearing the thin clouds on the horizon.
The two girls with the sun in a spiderweb bag are standing by the mountains south talking with the blue snake that makes holes in the wind with his whistle.
I can smell the heat of the day stuck on the edges of the cracks in the earth like a salt crust after a tide. I lay back and watch the sky. I close my eyes. I run my hands out smooth over the rug and feel the cold rising from the earth. When I come again I will bring a friar's robe with a deep cowl and shoes of jute fiber. I will run like a madman to the west all night until I begin to fall asleep; then I will walk back, being careful to correct for the tilt of the earth, the force of Coriolis, reading my breviary by the precise arrowlightt of stars, assured of my destination.
The day hugs the desert floor like a fallen warrior. I am warm. I am alert for any sort of light. I believe there is someplace out there where you can see right down into the heart of the earth. The light there is strong enough to burn out your eyes like sap in a fire. But I won't go near it. I let it pass. I like to know tha if I need it, with only a shovel or a small spade, I can begin digging and recall the day.
This time is the only time you will see the turtles massed on the eastern border for the march to the western edge where there is water, and then back the same night to hide in the bushes and smash insects dazed to lethargy in the cold. I have spoken with these turtles. They are reticent about their commitments. Each one looks like half the earth.
This is the only time you can study both of your shadows. If you sit perfectly still and watch your primary shadow as the sun sets you will be able to hold it long enough to see your other shadow fill up when the moon rises like a porcelain basin with clear water. If you turn carefully to face the south you may regard both of them; to understand the nature of silence you must be able to see into this space between your shadows.
This is the only time you will be able to smell water and not mistake it for the smell of a sheet of granite, or confuse it with the smell of marble or darkness. If you are moving about at this time, able to go anywhere you choose, you will find water as easily as if you were looking for your hands. It may take you some hours, even days to arrive at the place, but there will be no mistake about the direction to go once you smell it. The smell of water is not affected by the air currents so you won't need to know the direction of the wind; the smell of water lays along the surface of the earth like a long stick of peeled elmwood.
This is the only time you can hear the flight of the grey eagle over the desert. You cannot see him because he fades with the sun and is born out of it in the morning but it is possible to hear his wings pumping against the columns of warm air rising and hear the slip of the wind in his feathers as he tilts his gyre out over the desert floor. There is nothing out there for him, no rabbits to hunt, no cliff faces to fall from, no rock on which to roost, but he is always out there at this time fading to grey and then to nothing, turning on the wind with his eyes closed. It doesn't matter how high he goes or how far away he drifts, you will be able to hear him. It is only necessary to lie out flat somewhere and listen for the sound, like the wrinkling of the ocean.
The last thing you will notice will be the stones, small bits of volcanic ash, black glass, blue tourmaline, sapphires, narrow slabs of grey feldspar, rose quartz, sheets of mica and blood agate. They are small enough to be missed, laying down in the cracks of the desert floor, but they are the last things to give up the light; you will see them flare and burn like coals before they let go.
It is good to have a few of these kinds of stones with you in a pocket or cupped in your hands before you go to sleep. One man I knew, only for a short time, was sure the stones were more important than anything else; he kept a blue one tied behind his ear. One evening while we were talking he reached over and with a wet finger took alkaline dust and painted a small lightning bolt on his right cheek. I regarded him for more than an hour before it became too dark to see. I rolled myself up in this blanket and slept.

16 comments:

Manya Maratou said...

hey Grace, thanks for this. Iposted a response on mythcolour.

Manya Maratou said...

and only after a while did I think of googling barry lopez
well, thanks again
a door opening. another one

Deb G said...

Oh how wonderful this is...

Velma said...

lopez writes with an amazing brilliance.

Anonymous said...

When we tell our singular story using the power of sight, touch, taste, smell, sound and link that with our ability to use whatever artistic gifts we possess, life unfolds in a connective, collective way.

From Barry Lopez: "It is through the power of observation, the gifts of eye and ear, of tongue and nose and finger that a place first rises up in our mind: afterword it is memory that carries the place, that allows it go grow in depth and complexity. For as long as our records go back, we have held these two things dear; landscape and memory. Each infuses us with a different kind of life. The one feeds us, figuratively and literally. The other protects us from lies and tyranny..."

Marti

Anonymous said...

Correction: Typo in sentence!should read, "afterword,it is memory that carries the place, that allows it to grow in depth and complexity."

Marti

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

MartiAnon ~
i hope you were able to see the
Bill Moyers interview ... he
chose barry Lopez as his final
interview.

Anonymous said...

Yes I did and here is a link to the transcript of this last interview between Bill Moyers and Barry Lopez.

www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/04302010/transcript3.html

Moyers speaks of how Lopez uses nature as our oldest metaphor.

Lopez says,"that's our ancestral stuff. And when you had an emotion that you had no language for, or I had an emotion I had no language for, I would have to find a referent out there to bring it in to you. So, it's the oldest metaphor, because our stories began where we used animals and wind and light as a context in which to develop something that was very complicated. And that's how we communicated with each other."

And we come to this form of communication, blogging and your blog, windthread, where you talk story through your cloth and so your cloth, your words, both written and threaded, connect with planetary women from everywhere, all sharing what it means to be on this planet at this particular time, living, loving, searching, wondering, giving, creating a universal story.

Marti

jennlui said...

thank you for this grace! i haven't read too much barry lopez, but one of my favorites is crow and weasel. small easy read (i think it's for kids actually) but so many good lessons in there.

i've actually been reading lots the past few days on the different tales of the trickster. my favorite character in native american legends... digging up all my old anthropology books on this. so much good stuff there.

i look forward to reading more barry lopez. thank you. xox

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

jennlui
the great thing IS, we are all
trickster in some way just as we all are everything.
I think of that today, especially,
on the knowing of the FLIGHT of
Louise Bourgeois...one of the
ultimate women tricksters of our time...we need to carry on.

Deb G said...

I watched the Bill Moyers interview last night...so much to think about. Keep thinking especially about "leaning towards the light."

Velma said...

i teach crow and weasel most years--interesting to kids who are unfamiliar with more formal, reverant language. they like the ambiguity of the characters (is he really a crow??) anyhow, i like the question of how our stories began.

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

velma, i'll stop at the library today. it's been a long time since i last read Crow and Weasel.

Are you curious about me? said...

Thank you so much for introducing me to this author. Barry Lopez a name I should have heard about, what amazing writing.

I have just orderd from my library Artic Dreams it's the only book that they have of his. I can't wait for it to arrive.

Thank you once again

~ Julie

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

julie, left message at "your house"
and i am so glad to have shared
this really important writing.
thanks for visiting here

Linda said...

Grace I am reading your entire blog. I am so taken with your words and your art. I loved the story and thought you wrote it until I read the comments, duh.. should read the headings. I am also a raven, crow lover. Did you see Nature? when they did a special on crows? It is on PBS and you can watch it from there on your computer. Anyway, just want you to know you are inspiring me and you have an admirer in Seattle.